Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Additional information on making your own Yoga Props!

You know Simplicity has come out with patterns for making bolsters, cushions, yoga mat bags and such, but there is a wealth of info out there on the web to help you make your own yoga props.

Here is the list.

Here are some additional links to making your own yoga mat bag, even a cool video, and a way to make a yoga mat wrap....plus some more on zafu's!!

Gaileee, YogaFit's First RYT Graduate...now I'm an E-RYT!

http://www.figandplum.com/archives/000016.html

http://www.taunton.com/threads/pages/t00167.asp

http://www.pinkofperfection.com/2006/05/look_ma_no_pattern_sewing_a_yo.php

http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/lv_entertaining/article/0,2041,DIY_14108_3246500,00.html

http://www.orangebeautiful.com/blog/post.php?post_id=567

http://www.wholeliving.com/article/yoga-mat-tote-bag

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?listing_id=9940587

http://www.craftbits.com/viewProject.do?projectID=712

http://annascorneroftheworld.blogspot.com/2007/09/fo-yoga-mat-bag.html

http://handmade.loriz.ca/mt/archives/2006/08/yoga_mat_bag.html

http://tingaling.wordpress.com/2008/03/08/yoga-mat-wrap/

Instructions no longer on the websites, so I've copied the jpegs
onto this site.

Make those meditation pillows (zafu's)



http://zen.columbia.missouri.org/pics/zafu.jpg


http://zen.columbia.missouri.org/pics/zabuton.jpg


http://zen.columbia.missouri.org/pics/zafu1.jpg


http://zen.columbia.missouri.org/pics/zafu2.jpg

Updated 2/2013
Article no longer available.  Here are the contents

How to Make a Zafu and Zabuton

Posted by Som on Monday, March 13, 2006
Whether you're looking for some comfortable, casual seating or you want to make your meditation sessions more pleasant, a zafu and zabuton are wonderful things to have around the house. Zafu and zabuton are traditional Japanese cushions used for meditation; the zafu is a circular pillow with pleated sides, and the zabuton is pretty much just a large, flat pillow. You can order them online for $40+ each, but it's cheaper and more satisfying to make your own at home.



(I don't have the best meditation posture, but you get the idea of how the cushions work. The zabuton is a little small for me, because this is one I made for a friend who's shorter than I am.)

The zafu elevates and cushions the pelvis, and the zabuton cushions the knees and ankles. This position facilitates better posture, eases joint and back pain, and may help one achieve deeper, longer meditation sessions. As long as you're making one set, why not make two? Keep the extra set for guests, give it to a friend who meditates or has back problems, or donate it to your local Zen center or Buddhist temple.
About the materials: I chose to use a cotton/polyester blend for these because it's cheap and easy to clean with a wet rag; these aren't something you can just throw in the washing machine. When I'm more settled in my meditation practice, I'll probably make another set out of some heavy silk, perhaps adding some colorful embroidery or sashiko stitching.

As for filler, I used organic pillow-grade buckwheat hulls for the zafu and plain ol' polyester stuffing for the zabuton. Kapok would be a better choice for both, but it's fairly expensive. Manna Harvest sells organic buckwheat hulls for $8.95US/5 lbs. The only US source for kapok I could find is Carolina Morning Designs, and their prices are pretty high. From what I hear about kapok, though, it's probably worth the price.
Click below for full instructions on how to make the zafu and zabuton.
Zafu
Materials:
  • Cotton/polyester blend fabric, 2 yards (note: 2 yards is enough for two zafu)
  • Pillow-grade buckwheat hulls, 5 lbs.
  • Zipper
  • Sewing thread
  • Sewing machine
  • Hand-sewing needle, pins, scissors
  • Iron, ironing board, and water spray bottle
You can download PDF instructions for making your own zafu listed above. That's what I started with, but I had to tweak it a little for my own use. I recommend downloading it even if you're going to use my instructions, as the illustrations in the PDF are quite helpful.

Cut a strip of fabric 65" x 7" (there are a few extra inches in the length for fudging purposes.) Cut two circles 13" in diameter - I used a 13" round serving plate for my template, but you could also make from cardboard using a compass and a pencil.

Pleat the long strip of fabric: measure 4.5" inches from one end and mark. Make two more marks 3/4" from the first. Measuring from your center mark, repeat the process every 4" until you have 14 pleats marked. Fold, iron, and pin the pleats (since the iron setting for polyester blends usually isn't high enough for steam, use a water spray bottle for best results.)

On the end you started pleating at, fold back the fabric 1/2" and iron. Begin pinning the strip of fabric around one of the fabric circles. When you get to the end, you'll have a few extra inches of fabric. Fold back and iron. Pin your zipper in place on the folded ends of the fabric, making sure to cut and secure the zipper at least 1" away from the top and bottom of the fabric to allow room for sewing. Use the sewing machine and a zipper foot to sew the zipper in place; hand-stitch the remaining seam of the side strip width. Trim the extra fabric behind the zipper.

Using the sewing machine, stitch the side fabric strip to the first circle of fabric with a 3/8" seam allowance. Then pin and sew to the second circle. Trim the extra thread, remove any remaining pins, and turn the pillow.
Stuff as much buckwheat hull as you can into the pillow. This is a little tricky, as buckwheat hulls are tiny and quite devious. Also, they really hurt under bare feet. Fill it as much as you can, shake it down, and fill some more. I used almost all of the 5 lbs. of buckwheat hulls I purchased. Once it's full, try it out. You may find that you'd be more comfortable with more or less filling - hence the zipper. (And, I'll admit, I'm terrible at blindstitching. The zipper is my way of cheating.)

If you want to make your circles a different diameter, here is how you calculate where to place your pleats and how long a strip of fabric you need: Multiply the diameter of your fabric circle by pi (3.14159.) This will give you the circumference; for a 13" diameter, I got a 40.84" circumference. Add 1" for the zipper seams (=41.84".) For 14 pleats, each 3/4" and using 1 1/2" of fabric, add 21" (=62.84".) Add a couple of inches for fudging purposes, so you'll be sure not to run out of fabric and have to start all over again (=65".)
To determine where to put your pleats, take the length of your fabric strip, minus the 1" of seam allowance and 2" or so for fudging allowance (in my case, 62".) Divide by 15 (=4.13".) Round off as best you can (=4".) Remember to add your 1/2" seam allowance for the measurement before the first pleat (=4 1/2".)
Zabuton
Materials:
  • Cotton/polyester blend fabric, 1 1/2 yards
  • Polyester, cotton, or kapok stuffing, ~2 lbs.
  • Sewing thread, machine, etc.
Cut two rectangles of fabric, 32 1/2" x 27 1/2" (if you're over 6' tall, add a few inches to both dimensions. You need it to be big enough to accomodate you when sitting crosslegged with your knees comfortably cushioned on the zabuton.) Note: Cutting a straight line that long can be difficult. In order to make sure that my cuts are indeed straight, and that I end up with 90o angles, I use the pulled thread method for cutting straight lines in fabric.

Pin the rectangles together and stitch around the edges with a 3/8" seam allowance, leaving an opening about 4" wide on one side for turning and stuffing. Make sure to backstitch at the corners and on both sides of the opening. If you like, you can stitch a small curve on the edges or add a rise, but it's not necessary.
Turn and stuff. A word about polyester stuffing: it's tempting to just grab wads of stuffing and jam it in there without a care in the world, but you'll end up with a lumpy, unusable pillow. Take the time to do it right. Grab a handful of stuffing and pinch off little pieces. You can make a big pile of pinched stuffing and then stuff the pillow by the handful. You'll use a lot less stuffing this way, and your zabuton will be nice and fluffy - not lumpy.

Once the zabuton is stuffed to your liking (I stuffed to about a 2" rise,) stitch the opening shut. To keep the stuffing from shifting about too much, tuft the zabuton. I added four tufts, each about 8" from the corners toward the center of the pillow. To tuft, take a sewing needle and a 18" length of thread. Double your thread and pierce both layers of the pillow; pull the needle through, but leave a few inches of thread on top. Bring the needle back through both layers of pillow near the first stitch. Pull both ends of the thread tight and tie it off carefully. Clip the extra thread.

...and you're done! A few hours of work yields a very comfortable place to sit and meditate, read, watch teevee, knit, whatever.
 http://www.urbandecline.com/articles/2006/03/13/how-to-make-a-zafu-and-zabuton
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